White-Collar Crimes 101: White-Collar Criminal Behavior Explained

White Collar Crime AttorneysThe term “white-collar crime” is one used to explain criminal acts usually accomplished by means of deception rather than force or threat. Generally, white-collar crimes are financially motivated, non-violent crimes committed by business professionals of some sort; however, this is certainly not always the case. For example, identity theft – a type of white-collar crime – can be committed by anyone. The same goes for insurance fraud, mail fraud, and tax evasion or fraud.

Examples of White-Collar Crimes

Due to their financial gain nature, examples of white-collar crimes include, but aren’t limited to:

  • Asset forfeiture.
  • Bankruptcy fraud.
  • Computer tampering.
  • Conspiracy.
  • Copyright infringement.
  • Corporate fraud.
  • Embezzlement.
  • Financial institution fraud.
  • Forgery.
  • Health care fraud.
  • Identity theft.
  • Insider trading.
  • Insurance fraud.
  • Mail fraud.
  • Mass marketing fraud.
  • Money laundering.
  • Mortgage fraud.
  • Piracy or intellectual property theft.
  • Pyramid schemes.
  • Securities and commodities fraud.
  • Tax evasion and fraud.

Understand that if you’re being charged with any of the above, or some other type of white-collar crime, a skilled criminal law attorney with experience in white-collar crimes can help you better understand the details of the criminal charge.

White-Collar Crimes vs. Blue-Collar Crimes

As opposed to white-collar crimes, which are most often motivated by financial gain earned by deception, blue-collar crimes are committed as a means of whatever is available to the offender.

For example, where a white-collar crime might include embezzling company funds, blue-collar crimes might include using a firearm to rob a convenience store. While both are crimes and both take illegally acquire money, one is carried out by means of deception (the white-collar embezzlement) and the other is carried out by force (the blue-collar robbery).

Typically, white-collar crimes aren’t as obvious as blue-collar crimes. For example, often times a white-collar crime can’t be captured on surveillance cameras like a blue-collar crime – such as vandalism or theft – can.

Investigating White-Collar Crimes

Generally, instead of local law enforcement officers, special law enforcement units or government agencies enforce and investigate white-collar crimes. Such agencies include the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Justice Department, and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). These agencies have much vaster resources at their disposal than traditional law enforcement officers, and can spend a great deal of time – sometimes even years – building their cases before they bring forth charges or make any arrests.

If you’re being investigated or have been charged with a white-collar crime, never divulge any information that might incriminate you; better yet, never provide any information you’re not court-ordered to do so, without the presence of your criminal law attorney.

Have You Been Charged With a White-Collar Crime?

If you’ve been charged with any white-collar crime, contact the attorneys at Farkas and Crowley right away. Serving the West Palm Beach and surrounding areas, the lawyers at Farkas and Crowley are vastly experienced in defending white-collar criminal prosecutions on both state and federal levels. Call us today at 561-444-9529 or contact us online for your free consultation.